Elixir for the Soul

This is a blog about sophisticated drinking, because alcohol doesn't have to be a poison, it can be a medicine for the soul.

Shawn, 21. Currently studying foreign language at university in China. Researching about cocktails is one of my passions, and I hope this blog can introduce others to the true way of imbibing. Every drink on this page is mixed, tasted and photographed by me.

Feel free to ask.

Mai Tai
Aged Rum - 2 oz
Orange Curaçao - 1/2 oz
Orgeat Syrup - 3/4 oz
Lime Juice - 1 oz
Shake and strain into an old-fashioned glass filled with crushed ice.
Mai Tai is a delicious Tiki style cocktail, the name “Mai Tai” came from “mai tai roa ae”, meaning “out of this world - the best” in Tahitian language. Most people would agree that this cocktail was invented by Victor Bergeron in 1944, who founded the restaurant chain Trader Vic’s.
This is his original recipe:
17-year-old J. Wray Nephew Jamaican Rum - 2 oz
French Garnier Orgeat - 1/2 oz
DeKuyper Orange Curaçao - 1/2 oz
Rock Candy Syrup - 1/4 oz
Juice of 1 Lime
So leave your pineapple juice and grenadine out of this.
1. Some recipes use 1 oz dark rum and 1 oz light rum, although I’m fine with that, I’d prefer using 2 oz of a quality aged rum, it really works better in this drink.
2. The difficulty is to get the ratio right between the curaçao, orgeat and lime juice. This is the same theory in creating a sour-type drink, forming the balance between sweet and sour, also adjust to your taste.
3. Curaçao is an orange-flavoured liqueur, sweeter than triple sec. It used to be made in lots of colours, nowadays there’s only blue and orange. The one I used was Bols Dry Orange.
4. Orgeat is an almond-flavoured syrup. I use Monin.
5. It’s also acceptable to add a dash of simple syrup if it’s not quite sweet enough.
Like all tropical drinks, you can be creative on the garnish a little bit: a cherry, an umbrella, or even a sonia orchid… However in the original recipe, the garnish were a piece of lime and a sprig of mint. The mint leaves are the key in my opinion, adds that extra layer of aroma to perfect this cocktail, just make sure you give it a light clap to release the oil. Another interesting garnish is to float a thin layer of overproof rum on the top, again, its entirely up to you.

Mai Tai

Aged Rum - 2 oz

Orange Curaçao - 1/2 oz

Orgeat Syrup - 3/4 oz

Lime Juice - 1 oz

Shake and strain into an old-fashioned glass filled with crushed ice.

Mai Tai is a delicious Tiki style cocktail, the name “Mai Tai” came from “mai tai roa ae”, meaning “out of this world - the best” in Tahitian language. Most people would agree that this cocktail was invented by Victor Bergeron in 1944, who founded the restaurant chain Trader Vic’s.

This is his original recipe:

17-year-old J. Wray Nephew Jamaican Rum - 2 oz

French Garnier Orgeat - 1/2 oz

DeKuyper Orange Curaçao - 1/2 oz

Rock Candy Syrup - 1/4 oz

Juice of 1 Lime

So leave your pineapple juice and grenadine out of this.

1. Some recipes use 1 oz dark rum and 1 oz light rum, although I’m fine with that, I’d prefer using 2 oz of a quality aged rum, it really works better in this drink.

2. The difficulty is to get the ratio right between the curaçao, orgeat and lime juice. This is the same theory in creating a sour-type drink, forming the balance between sweet and sour, also adjust to your taste.

3. Curaçao is an orange-flavoured liqueur, sweeter than triple sec. It used to be made in lots of colours, nowadays there’s only blue and orange. The one I used was Bols Dry Orange.

4. Orgeat is an almond-flavoured syrup. I use Monin.

5. It’s also acceptable to add a dash of simple syrup if it’s not quite sweet enough.

Like all tropical drinks, you can be creative on the garnish a little bit: a cherry, an umbrella, or even a sonia orchid… However in the original recipe, the garnish were a piece of lime and a sprig of mint. The mint leaves are the key in my opinion, adds that extra layer of aroma to perfect this cocktail, just make sure you give it a light clap to release the oil. Another interesting garnish is to float a thin layer of overproof rum on the top, again, its entirely up to you.